Breaking ground: ADM Fellow Wins 2019 Prime Minister’s Literary Award    For almost two and a half years, Dr Meredith Lake got used to writing in public libraries. She went from one “hot desk” to another, trying to piece together different historical documents to create a narrative about the Bible’s role in shaping Australian culture. It was tough going for the office-less historian, especially between pre-school drop off and pick up.   All that changed, though, when she was appointed as a Senior Research Fellow in ADM’s 2017 cohort. The Fellowship “was a game-changer for me,” Meredith says. “It put around me the resources I needed to do my best work, to finish the book, and I think, to grow as a person who has something to say.”      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     As a result, Meredith’s book,   The Bible in Australia: A Cultural History     (NewSouth Books) was published in 2018 and has gone on to earn a number of positive reviews and prestigious awards, including most notably the  2019 Australian History Prize  in the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards which took place in Canberra. She also won the  2019 Australian History Prize  in the NSW Premier’s History Awards, the  2018 Australian Christian Book of the Year , and the  CHASS Australian Book Prize .  “The Bible is everywhere in the history of Australia since British settlement – ‘under Australian skin’, as Meredith Lake eloquently puts it – yet  The Bible in Australia  is the first occasion on which an historian has placed it in the foreground as a subject in its own right”, wrote one of the  judges  of the 2019 NSW Premier’s History Awards.   Another judge called  The Bible in Australia , “a book of remarkable originality. Formidably researched yet carrying its scholarship with an enviable lightness of touch, this is a ground-breaking cultural and social history.”    Meredith hardly imagined such responses when she was scouring documents and writing each chapter of the book during her Fellowship. “Receiving such a generous part time fellowship from Anglican Deaconess Ministries was an absolutely critical intervention,” she said when accepting her NSW Premier’s History Award. “It enabled me to keep going, finish the book, and to do my best writing.”   Shortly after  her “best writing” was published, the book began to earn the attention of the broader culture and brought numerous reviews from major media like  The Sydney Morning Herald ,  The Australian  and others across the nation, calling it, “endlessly fascinating”, “superbly engaging” and “extraordinary”.         “From the opening words about Bra Boy tattoos, this book had me gripped,” said Julia Baird of The Drum. “It breathes colour, poetry and life into our understanding of the Bible in Australia. It’s a vital, much-needed addition to our understanding of faith in our country . . . stunning, refreshing and original.”  Consequently, Meredith has also received numerous invitations to appear in the media and deliver keynote talks on faith, history and Australian culture, including as the 2018 lecturer for ADM’s  Annual Public Lecture  and the  2019 New College Lectures , where she hosted and moderated a conversation between Archbishop Glenn Davies and Archbishop Anthony Fisher on the themes of faith, hope and love.   And earlier this year, the historian became a broadcaster as well when she was appointed the host of   Soul Search   on ABC Radio National—a weekly show about the lived experience of religion and spirituality in Australia.  “ADM is honoured to have played a role in Meredith’s remarkable story. She personifies what we hope to do through our  Fellowships Program  by investing in Christian women and their projects at the crucial mid-career stage,” said Dr Annette Pierdziwol, Director of Public Engagement. “Our vision is to see the public sphere filled with the voices of theologically-grounded and generous women, like Meredith. We can’t wait to see what she does next.”   

Comment

Breaking ground: ADM Fellow Wins 2019 Prime Minister’s Literary Award

For almost two and a half years, Dr Meredith Lake got used to writing in public libraries. She went from one “hot desk” to another, trying to piece together different historical documents to create a narrative about the Bible’s role in shaping Australian culture. It was tough going for the office-less historian, especially between pre-school drop off and pick up.

Comment

      Flourishing: ADM’S COO Clare Steele appointed to lead Compassion Australia     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Clare Steele, ADM’s Chief Operating Officer, has been appointed as Compassion Australia’s next CEO.  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Clare Steele, ADM’s Chief Operating Officer, has long been a supporter of Compassion Australia. Her family has sponsored a child for years, and her husband Matt, an Anglican minister, has participated in Compassion-sponsored pastor’s trips overseas.     But it wasn’t until Clare travelled with her family to Cebu City, Philippines, last year that she saw first-hand the extraordinary work Compassion was doing.    “Matt came back from his first trip blown away and believed there were fewer things more important to do with our resources than to serve and give to the work of Compassion, especially with the way churches were flourishing there with the Gospel ministry,” Clare said. “So when we had the opportunity to go as a family with our church, well, I don’t think any of us had seen the power of the Gospel so strongly at work as we did there in the projects and the churches.”  The experience was so transformative that Clare began to wonder if there was more she could do to serve the mission of Compassion Australia. And when Matt learned that Tim Hanna, Compassion Australia’s CEO since 2010, had announced he’d be retiring at the end of 2019, he encouraged his wife to apply. It was the last thing Clare expected to do; still, she submitted her application, went through the interview process and in July, the board of directors for Compassion Australia announced Clare as the next CEO of the organisation.   “It was a big decision but we felt that God had chosen this time and this role for us as a family,” she said.   Now after three years at Anglican Deaconess Ministries, two as COO, Clare will be taking her leadership skills to Compassion Australia’s headquarters in Newcastle where she’ll oversee more than 150 staff across the country who help care for the 120,000 children sponsored through thousands of Australian churches and communities. She begins her new role part time in November in what she calls a “learning, listening and praying phase” and will begin full time as CEO in January, one of only three women CEOs in Compassion around the world.            
   
     “ If more women had the heart of deaconesses, the world would be a better place ” 
   
  
 
          “It’s the greatest joy in my role to see women flourish in Kingdom work, responding to God’s call in their lives. To see Clare flourish in her role at ADM as COO and then pursue faithfully this next role at Compassion brings me great joy personally, and inspiration for our team as a whole,” said Dr Kate Harrison Brennan, CEO of ADM. “We want to see women raised up with theological formation who are practically and publicly engaged. Clare embodies this. We will miss Clare greatly but we are excited for her for this season ahead and will be praying her onwards!”  Clare leaves a much-loved mark on the ADM staff, with ten direct reports and so many new programs and events that it’s hard to miss her fingerprint. During her tenure at ADM, Clare has helped oversee the launch of the School of Theology, Culture & Public Engagement, the new office opening at St. Andrew’s House, a series of new MAC courses, Annual Funding Events, and numerous other programs, events and ministries, helping create a culture of hospitality and organisational excellence.  “I’ve gotten really good at food,” she said. “Seriously, I feel grateful for the opportunities I’ve had at ADM. My role here has been so wide: I can go from looking at the annual report layout to finalising budgets to caring for staff to answering emails from program users, all the normal administration that comes with running a business and ministry. But as our company secretary Ken Breakspear has taught me, it only matters if we offer it in prayer.”  Originally from the Blue Mountains, Clare’s Sydney career first began studying electronic engineering—mechatronics to be specific—at the University of Western Sydney before also earning her Master of Divinity from Sydney Missionary and Bible College. She has lived in Sydney’s inner west for 18 years and has worked in childcare as a children’s services manager as well as a consultant in various banks and corporate settings. Because Matt has served as minister for the past ten years at St. Alban’s Anglican Church in Five Dock, Clare has also been a part of building community and coordinating ministry opportunities and events through the church.           
   
     “ Each has taught me that leadership is about people first, to really want to see them flourish.  ” 
   
  
 
          “Leaving our community (in Five Dock) as well as ADM won’t be easy,” she said. “But we know it’s part of what it means to trust God together. It’s been inspiring to watch staff members grow or to see the excitement of a church member as they deepen their understanding of the Gospel. Each has taught me that leadership is about people first, to really want to see them flourish. My greatest joys at ADM have been to see my team grow, the laughs we’ve had and the things we’ve achieved as a team.”  Along with their children Jackson, 14, Rori, 12, and Cooper, 9, Clare and Matt look forward to discovering a new community in a new part of the country, and to watching how God provides for them as a family. That same enthusiasm is what will motivate the new CEO as she helps care for supporters and advance the vision of Compassion Australia: to see more children released from poverty in Jesus’ name. Though it’s her first experience as a CEO, Clare believes her experiences at ADM, in business and ministry have uniquely prepared her for this opportunity. Compassion Australia, like ADM, is also about helping women and their children flourish in God’s kingdom.  “That means as people give monthly financial support for school and essentials, they are also called into a deep commitment to the child’s life through a relationship and through prayer,” she said. “Things like writing letters really matter, as well as helping inspire their churches to better care for their communities, to care for these kids that God cares for and to help them flourish.”  As she moves into this next phase of flourishing for God’s kingdom, Clare also looks forward to hearing how ADM continues to help women use their gifts to serve and to see the Gospel go out in creative and interesting ways.  “If more women had the heart of deaconesses, the world would be a better place,” she said. “I’m so thankful to have served the mission of ADM, that there’s an organisation like it at all that cares so deeply about women. It has been such a privilege.”                  Tweet            Find out more about Compassion     

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Flourishing: ADM’S COO Clare Steele appointed to lead Compassion Australia

Clare Steele, ADM’s Chief Operating Officer, has long been a supporter of Compassion Australia. Her family has sponsored a child for years, and her husband Matt, an Anglican minister, has participated in Compassion-sponsored pastor’s trips overseas.

But it wasn’t until Clare travelled with her family to Cebu City, Philippines, last year that she saw first-hand the extraordinary work Compassion was doing.

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       2019 Annual Funding Event Profile:  Sarah Crowe’s invention offers the precious gift of sight and receives top award    By Susan Milne   When Dr Sarah Crowe, a Sydney-based ophthalmic surgeon, visited an eye clinic in the Solomon Islands, she saw first hand the serious vision problems of many residents. Even as she diagnosed them, she realised that few had access to treatment or surgery let alone glasses.   During the next few days, Sarah began to notice in fact that no one was wearing glasses. Simple reading glasses were non-existent so almost anyone over 45 had difficulty reading. The other implications were obvious to her as well: people struggled to learn, work, drive or care for others simply because they couldn’t see well. And while she saw the impact that governments and NGOS were having with various eye health clinics or surgical visits, she realised these people’s simple need was for affordable accessible glasses.  So Sarah returned to Sydney and tinkered in between patient appointments and trips until she invented a system that enables those living in inaccessible and often disadvantaged communities to have their eyes tested and prescription glasses assembled on the spot. The 4eyes system offers the gift of sight to people in the world’s most remote locations and helped Sarah receive ADM’s Annual Funding Event (AFE) top award last month in the Startup and Beyond category: $30,000.   As part of her pitch at the AFE, Sarah described the reaction of those who had participated in the 4eyes pilot trial. The trial took place in Papua New Guinea last year, and many who had suffered vision impairment for most of their life received spectacles to correct the problem.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       “To see people put on their glasses for the first time in their life is so rewarding, they are amazed and often quite overwhelmed. Some are speechless, some laugh and some cry.”      Originally from Montreal, Sarah continued to work in developing communities and quickly realised how few people had access to spectacles. She also came across research from the World Health Organisation that states that 53 percent of avoidable blindness is due to uncorrected refractive error. A recent study in PNG confirmed that it is the largest cause of poor vision, and the majority of people affected are in remote and developing communities. Why? Three reasons: lack of professional services to test for prescription, cost and geographic isolation.  “There was no one to test for glasses and no way to get them due to lack of access to testing and the cost,” she explains. “The amount of money that goes into trying to improve healthcare in developing communities is huge and yet this relatively simple problem, which would be relatively cheap to fix, was not being addressed.”  Sarah turned her considerable skills to developing a system of testing for refractive error and instant assembly of spectacles using universal frames and pre-cut lenses. The initial field trial, conducted in partnership and with generous funding from the Kokoda Track Foundation, was held at the remote Kou Kou village in Oro Province, PNG. Five hundred men and women had their vision tested, and 300 pairs of spectacles were assembled on the spot for those who needed them.        

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       “In a follow-up questionnaire, 98 per cent of respondents gave the highest rating possible to their improvement in vision, but also in improvement to their quality of life,” Sarah said. “Many specifically stated that they were able to read their Bibles for the first time.”  Because of this pioneering work, Sarah was invited to join 12 other entrepreneurial and inspiring women who also pitched their ideas at ADM’s funding event. But when Sarah was awarded the largest grant, she was surprised and delighted.  “It was an amazing day, not only receiving the funding which was a tremendous boost but being surrounded by the encouragement and optimism of the other women presenting their cases for funding,” Sarah said. “Setting up and running a project like 4eyes is such hard work, such an investment of time and money, and sometimes I have questioned whether I can carry on. Receiving the award gave me much needed affirmation and a sense of empowerment which gives me strength to continue. And the community around ADM is an incredible group of women.”  The ADM funding, which is likely to be matched by AusIndustry, a federal government organisation which supports innovation, and continuing support from KTF will be used to scale up the project in PNG, with the aim of providing spectacles for at least 1,000 more vision-impaired people there before being rolled out in other countries including the Philippines, Fiji, East Timor, India and hopefully across remote regions of Australia.  The 4eyes Foundation has also been set up to receive tax-deductible donations and has recently registered as a charity. And key to the future of 4eyes is adequate funding, says Sarah, who in addition to countless hours spent on the 4eyes equipment and working as an ophthalmic surgeon, has a busy family life with husband Phillip and four adult children.   Yet she says her Christian faith helped drive the development of the 4eyes system in the first place.  “My faith is a practical faith, it’s faith in action,” Sarah said. “I believe we are all part of a human community and God has put us on Earth to help each other. I simply feel I have an obligation to use my skills and experience to help others.”    To support the 4eyes Foundation and for more information, contact Sarah Crowe by email on sarahcrowe4@gmail.com                  Tweet

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2019 Annual Funding Event Profile: Sarah Crowe’s invention offers the precious gift of sight and receives top award

When Dr Sarah Crowe, a Sydney-based ophthalmic surgeon, visited an eye clinic in the Solomon Islands, she saw first hand the serious vision problems of many residents. Even as she diagnosed them, she realised that few had access to treatment or surgery let alone glasses. 

3 Comments

       For the Church: free mental health video series and resources launched for World Mental Health Day, 10. Oct.                          
   
     “ Christians are people of hope, loved by God, and can offer both to others. We’re excited to see how these videos and resources assist the church as it cares for its people. ” 
   
   — Sarah Condie 
 
       In light of Mental Health Month this October, Anglican Deaconess Ministries’ Mental Health and Pastoral Care Institute (MHPCI) in partnership with Mary Andrews College has launched a set of free resources to assist churches in addressing mental illness. The “10/10” initiative —named after World Mental Health Day on 10 Oct.— includes 10 personal video interviews with carers, those living with mental illness, ministers and professionals, all aimed at addressing stigma and encouraging conversation around mental health within church communities.   “The church has so much to offer those dealing with mental illnesses or struggling with mental health issues,” says Sarah Condie, co-director of the MHPCI. “Christians are people of hope, loved by God, and can offer both to others. We’re excited to see how these videos and resources assist the church as it cares for its people.”  Accompanying the trailer and short videos is a free practical church service packet that includes talking points, specific prayers, church announcements, biblical readings, and tips to support those struggling with mental health. Church leaders can use the guide as necessary to assist their congregations in acknowledging the reality of mental illness amongst all Australians and particularly within the church. The videos and accompanying resources are free and accessible to anyone any time of the year through the MHPCI website,  www.mentalhealthinstitute.org.au .   “Because nearly one in two Australians will experience a diagnosable mental health condition within their lifetime, we wanted to acknowledge the importance of caring for those who might be struggling,” said Rev. Dr Keith Condie, co-director of the MHPCI. “God does not look upon people according to their feelings or how mentally healthy they are, but according to the faithfulness of Jesus Christ. These resources provide churches with ways to communicate this message to members of churches and to offer them encouragement, comfort and practical support.”  The MHPCI provides church and ministry leaders everywhere with biblically and theologically informed training and resources for pastoral care with excellence. Its primary purpose is to promote well-being while alleviating distress, especially for those suffering from mental illness. The Institute’s work seeks to answer the question: “how can churches better understand and address mental health and pastoral care issues?” It draws on the wisdom and guidance of the bible combined with the best psychological and medical research to provide resources to make a real and lasting impact on the mental and spiritual well-being of people in churches and communities.   “Mental Health Month is an initiative that encourages individuals to consider mental health and wellbeing, regardless of their lived experience” said Rev. Dr Condie. “It’s a great opportunity for the Christian church to help understand the importance of mental health and to care for its people with grace and wisdom.”       
   
     “ It’s a great opportunity for the Christian church to help understand the importance of mental health and to care for its people with grace and wisdom. ” 
   
  
 
      View all the videos and download the resources at    www.mentalhealthinstitute.org.au                  Tweet

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10/10 Video Series

For the Church: ADM’s Mental Health & Pastoral Care Institute launches 10 personal video interviews with carers, those living with mental illness, ministers and professionals, as well as a resource pack all aimed at addressing stigma and encouraging conversation around mental health within church communities.

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       Rev. Dr Katy Smith Appointed New Principal for Mary Andrews College        

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Because of her passion for theological education, her commitment to and vision for Gospel-centred ministry, and her exemplary Christian leadership and scholarship, Rev. Dr Katy Smith has been appointed the eleventh principal of Mary Andrews College (MAC) in Sydney.      Unique as the only Bible college in Australia founded to equip women for ministry, a mission begun in 1891, Mary Andrews College welcomes Dr Smith’s contributions to its rich tradition of training students for Christian service in a changing world. Anglican Deaconess Ministries, under which MAC resides, appointed Dr Smith to the leadership role, which will begin in March 2020.  Dr Smith comes to MAC from the Church Missionary Society in South Australia and the Northern Territory, where she has served as the Executive Officer/Branch Director for the past two years, working with the local church to raise up, equip, and send out long-term cross-cultural workers for the sake of the world’s gospel poor. Prior to her leadership role at CMS, she served for seven years as the Old Testament Lecturer and Director of Postgraduate Studies at Bible College of South Australia (ACT). During that time, she completed her PhD through Trinity College Bristol at the University of Bristol on “The Persuasive Intent of the Book of Leviticus” and had the privilege of writing within the research community of Tyndale House in Cambridge. Her research master’s degree—which she earned from Ridley College while also teaching—explored a theology of God’s grace in the Psalter. During this time, Dr Smith was ordained in the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne and served as an Assistant Curate in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. She also earned from Ridley College a Bachelor of Theology with First Class Honours and an Advanced Diploma of Ministry.  “While I was training for vocational Gospel ministry, my lecturers invested time and energy shaping and mentoring me for a lifetime of ministry,” said Dr Smith. “Because of that, I was convicted of the responsibility to invest in the next generation to teach and preach the whole counsel of God with faithfulness and with the wisdom of the cross. That conviction redirected my steps.”       
   
     “ Katy Smith’s appointment is a real coup for MAC. Katy shows a heart for mission, a passion for gospel ministry, and academic rigour. She understands the ministry of women in the contemporary world and will lead with energy and faithfulness to the scriptures. ” 
   
   — Dr Lindsay Wilson, Academic Dean & Old Testament Lecturer, Ridley College 
 
     As a Lecturer first at Ridley and then at Bible College of South Australia (BCSA), she loved training and equipping students to understand and use the Old Testament in their ministry and mission contexts. Alongside her teaching at BCSA, she established and built the postgraduate coursework and research pathways, which offered further vocational development for Gospel workers in South Australia, and she has spoken at a variety of conferences for women in academia and in ministry.  “I am truly grateful to God for his provision of Rev. Dr Katy Smith as our next Principal of Mary Andrews College,” said Dr Kate Harrison Brennan, ADM’s CEO. “Katy brings personal experience of the significance of a Diploma of Theology, deep biblical understanding and demonstrated passion for mission and pastoral concern. I have every confidence in Katy to lead Mary Andrews College into the next season, continuing and building on its significant and distinctive mission.”      
   
     “ I’m very excited that Katy is taking up this role at Mary Andrews. Her strong faith, theological depth, and ministry experience combined with great people skills and strategic thinking make her a great fit for this key job. God’s richest blessings as she begins this new ministry! ” 
   
   — Maggie Crewes, SANT Missionary, CMS Australia 
 
     That leadership includes a vision for MAC where every woman can be equipped to serve Christ faithfully, Dr Smith said. She believes wholistic formation is key to theological education, not just building knowledge and practical skill, but a deep learning that shapes and forms women’s identities in Christ.   “As followers of Jesus, we are called to take up our cross and follow him, which includes how we manage and lead the organisations entrusted to us and also how we teach, train, and coach others,” Dr Smith said.  “Gospel-shaped leadership and service always seeks the interests of others before one’s self, leads in gentleness and kindness, and displays generosity and restorative grace as we flourish together in Christ.”  During her years as Principal, Mary Andrews was devoted to helping women flourish with their gifts, and in their ministry contexts, that God had given them. It is this characteristic that deeply resonated with Dr Smith. “That’s what makes me tick too,” she said. “So often women just survive in ministry, but flourishing is vital too for long-term faithful service.”    Dr Smith grew up in a British family in apartheid South Africa, later in the UK and then in Australia. Her parents provided every opportunity for her to hear about Jesus, but it wasn’t until years later through a physical injury that her faith in Jesus was solidified, and her biblical study began. When not teaching or writing for publication, Dr Smith enjoys baking, walking in national parks, reading spy thriller novels, and gathering friends and family around the table with good food and conversation.      
   
     “ Katy has used all her vision, energy and enthusiasm to help mobilise workers for God’s harvest field through CMS. As she begins as Principal of Mary Andrews College, she will bring those same gifts to equip and train gospel workers for ministry in Sydney and to the ends of the earth. ” 
   
   — David Williams, Director of Training and Development, CMS Australia 
 
     “I am passionate to see Gospel work multiplied and mobilised both locally and globally, around many tables,” she said. “This has motivated each step in a decade of experience in theological education. It is a great privilege to continue to use my skills both organisationally and academically to enable Mary Andrews College to continue moving forward, confidently focused on its purpose, mission, and vision to God’s glory.”  That enthusiasm and vision as well as Dr. Smith’s astute and engaging Bible teaching were what first encouraged Rev. Jenni Stoddart, Chair of the ADM Board, about MAC’s next Principal. “Katy’s faithfulness to God’s word is matched exactly with an infectious joy and passion, inviting others to come and discover the Lord Jesus whom she serves. My prayer is that God will use Katy and Mary Andrews College to grow its students in joyous faithful service!”   Mary Andrews College offers courses in biblical study, theology and practical ministry designed to help women of all ages and in all life stages deepen their relationship with God and develop their skills. In whatever contexts they serve, flexible course options for Diplomas, Certificates, Auditing or Pathways to Pastoral Care Ministry and Chaplaincy are available and taught by qualified, caring lecturers.     For more information, please visit    www.mac.edu.au   .       
	 More about Rev. Dr Katy Smith

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Rev. Dr Katy Smith Appointed New Principal for Mary Andrews College

Because of her passion for theological education, her commitment to and vision for Gospel-centred ministry, and her exemplary Christian leadership and scholarship, Rev. Dr Katy Smith has been appointed the eleventh principal of Mary Andrews College (MAC) in Sydney.

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      My story – By Miriam Numamurdird   Miriam Numamurdird is the first local Christian leader in the Northern Territory to participate in a unique pilot program. An ADM Mercy & Justice Grant is providing Miriam with a two-year paid traineeship in Bible translation & leadership development. She is working in partnership with Rev. Kate Beer, CMS Ministry Development Officer for the Diocese. Hear Miriam’s story…          My story   Well, in 2009, I changed my life [understood to mean ‘to follow Jesus’]. My husband and I went fishing one Saturday and caught a lot of fish and turtle. While I was fishing, I heard a voice in my ear singing. I told my husband that I could hear Randall’s voice singing in my ear [1]. It was so amazing to me.   Then we were walking back to our house and I was still hearing Randall singing that song in my ear.   When we got back home we were sitting around the fire at home and I was still hearing it. People were having Christian fellowship (singing and prayer time) outside [my neighbour] Hanna’s house. Well, my kids went to fellowship to dance to the action songs. Well, I got up and I walked with my kids. I told them I would wait for them at their grandmother’s house. But I didn’t go there, I went to fellowship!  And Sunday night, I decided to give my life [to Jesus], there and then.   In 2010, I went to Nungalinya College [2] to do some study. I did the Foundation course [in English literacy and numeracy] and in 2013-2015 I did the Certificate III in Theology. In 2016-2017 I did the Certificate IV in Theology.   I graduated and I finished all the study I was doing. In 2017, I called Kate Beer in the Diocesan Office for help. I wanted to hold Bible studies throughout the Easter week. It was the first time for my husband and I to have Easter in my community of Urapunga.   On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, we had Bible studies about Easter. People came and we sat talking together and everyone liked [the studies]. Those people were really hungry for God’s word! But on Thursday, we followed the story of Jesus’ death and the last supper Jesus had with his disciples. We went hunting and caught barramundi and a buffalo and cooked it all for dinner for everyone. They enjoyed it and they were singing and doing action songs and everyone was really happy.  We did it [again] last year in 2018. And this year a lot of people asked about coming to us at St Philip’s Urapunga [for Easter]. We welcome all people who come and have Easter with us. You are welcome!           1. Randall Carew is a Roper Valley singer/songwriter of the Rembarrnga and Ngalakan people.  2. An Indigenous Christian College in Darwin.         Miriam’s story in her native language Kriol:   Wal, langa 2009, aibin tjenjim main laif. Mi en main husband minbala bin go, imbin Satedei wikend minbala bin go langa riba fishing en minbala bin gajim big mob fish en shot nek tertel. Brom deya aibin stat irrim det bois langa main irriwoll singsingbat. Aibin dalim main husben mi irrimbat Randall bois singsingbat langa main irriwoll. Imbin brabli amazingwan blanga main.  En brom deya minbala bin wokwokbat bek langa kemp en aibin kipgon irrim det song wen Randall bin singsingbat langa main irriwoll.  Wen minbala bin la kemp minbala jidan langa fiya en aibin stil lisen wen aibin langa kemp. Olabat bin abumbat feloship langa Hanna kemp autsaid. Wal, main biginini mob bin go langa feloship blanga ekshan. Wal, aibin gidap en wok garra main biginini. Aibin dalim olabat ai garra wait blanga yumob langa yumob abuji kemp. Bat najing. Ai nomo bin langa olabat abuji kemp, aibin go garram olabat langa feloship!  En Sandei nait aibin jinggibat blaga gibit main laif deya na.   Langa 2010, aibin go langa Nungalinya koledj blanga dum stadi. Aibin dum faundashan, en 2013-2015 aibin dum sertifikit 3 thioloji, en 2016-2017 aibin dum sertifikit 4 thioloji.  Aibin gradyait en aibin binij deya na ol detlot stadi weya aibin dum. 2017, aibin kol en askim Kate Beer langa diocese ofis blanga album mi. Dumaji, aibin wandi abum Baibul stadi thru langa det ista wik. Imbin fes taim blanga mi en main husben bla abum ista deya langa Urapunga, main komyuniti.  Wal Mandei en Tyusdei en Wensdei melabat bin abum stadi blanga det ista na.   Pipul bin kaman en melabat bin jidan gija en toktokgija en ebriwan bin laigim. Det mob bin hanggriwan blanga det wed nomo lilbit. Bat Thesdei melabat bin bulurrum det stori blanga Jisas wen dei bin kilim im dead en det laswan sapa na, Jisas bin abum garram im wekinmenmob. En blanga tharran na melabat bin dum. Melabat bin go hanting en mela bin gaji barramundi en bulogi, en kukimbat supa blanga holot. Dei bin rili gudbinji, en ebriwan bin singsingbat en gudbinji.  Melabat bin dum las yiya, 2018. En bigmob pipul bin askim blanga kaman disyia langa melabat deya la Urapunga — St Filip tjetj. Melabat welkam ola pipul blanga kaman en abum ista garram melabat. Yumob welkam na!

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My story – By Miriam Numamurdird

Miriam Numamurdird is the first local Christian leader in the Northern Territory to participate in a unique pilot program. An ADM Mercy & Justice Grant is providing Miriam with a two-year paid traineeship in Bible translation & leadership development. She is working in partnership with Rev. Kate Beer, CMS Ministry Development Officer for the Diocese. Hear Miriam’s story…

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      When Christian women speak up   Mercy and justice program manager Libby Sanders on her recent visit to Canberra with Christian women leaders from across denominations advocating for action regarding violence against women and children in the Pacific region.       

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       
   
     “ Our closest neighbours, our brothers and sisters in Christ, are facing crises that diminish their flourishing and that we as the Australian Church must recognise and respond to. ” 
   
  
 
      Read Libby's article here

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When Christian women speak up

Mercy and justice program manager Libby Sanders on her recent visit to Canberra advocating for action regarding violence against women and children in the Pacific region.

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      Worship! With all the senses!  Mary Andrew College lecturer Louise Gosbell gives her reflections on the value of taste and touch in connecting with God.        

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       
   
     “ In what ways can we use tactile and sensory worship to further our memory and understanding of God’s word and make the most of the sensory abilities God has endowed us with? In what ways can we use our sensory experience to bring others into an understanding and experience of God for themselves also? ” 
   
  
 
      Read the Eternity News article

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Worship! With all the senses!

An article by MAC lecturer Louise Gosbell on the value of taste and touch in connecting with God.

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      Rev. Canon Dr Alison Milbank's keynote lecture  at STCPE in January 2019  The following is a video of the Rev. Canon Dr Alison Milbank’s opening keynote lecture at the 2019 School of Theology, Culture & Public Engagement. She is Associate Professor of Literature and Theology at the University of Nottingham, in the UK, and a leading thinker on imaginative apologetics.                
   
     “ Works of the imagination, just like Jesus’s parables, are proposals of a way of seeing reality ” 
   
   — Alison Milbank

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Rev. Canon Dr Alison Milbank's keynote lecture at STCPE 2019

The Rev. Canon Dr Alison Milbank’s opening keynote lecture at the School of Theology, Culture & Public Engagement in January 2019.

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       Q&A  with Michaela O’Donnell Long, 2019 ADM Visiting Fellow     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Scheduled around this year’s    Annual Funding Event   , ADM will host Dr. Michaela O’Donnell Long from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA as a Visiting Fellow. Because she’ll be involved in a variety of events during her time at ADM, we wanted folks to get to know her a bit.    ADM caught up with her recently and asked her the following questions.     ADM:   You grew up in the U.S. midwestern state of Nebraska, much of which is made up of farming communities. Tell us a bit about how the landscape/community might have shaped some of your perspectives and pursuits.    Michaela:  Ah, yes. I did grow up in Nebraska. Although it was nothing like bustling Sydney, I grew up in the city of Omaha. With about a half million people, it was a mid-sized city mostly made up of houses and shops and other suburban amenities. Outside the city in nearly any direction, you’d find agriculture of various kinds.   Reflecting back, I realise that a large swath of the year was measured by the production of corn. In summer, the mantra was that corn would be “knee high by the 4th of July.” In August, farmers would load up their freshly harvested corn and drive into Omaha to sell their harvest out of the back of pick up trucks. And by late September the leftover stalks in the field would turn to golden brown. So, although I’ve never picked an ear of corn in my life, the rhythm of planting, growing, and harvesting is forever sketched into the aesthetics of my brain. And that aesthetic has shaped my own expectation for my work. I trust the rhythm of what I have seen, that there is a time for planting, a time for growing, a time for harvesting, and a time to clear the fields.       ADM:   When you decided to attend university, the word on the street is you got an athletic scholarship. True? What sport/position? And so, from your personal experience, how might sports serve as a metaphor for working in ministry, business or an organisation?    Michaela:  It’s true. I had the privilege of playing softball for a few years in college—as pitcher first, then short stop. My husband and I were recently talking about how formative sports have been for me, and about how great athletes are coachable. They learn quickly that there is always room to grow, that critique of their game isn’t personal, and that in order to achieve big goals you’ve got to ever evolve in your game.   I carry this same belief into my work as a leader, writer, mother, and creative. Early on in my PhD process, I remember turning in a paper that I thought was profound. When I got it back from my professor, there was so much red ink on the page that I gasped. And when my face reflected my disappointment, he said something that any good coach would agree with: “In order to be a top level thinker, you’ve got to love the critique.” And, now my own leadership style resembles that of a coach—always working with my team to finesse their gifts and skills so that they might flourish in their work.        ADM:   You’re now at Fuller Theological Seminary in southern California, serving as the senior director at the    De Pree Centre    and a lecturer of practical theology—a long way from the softball field or Nebraska farmlands. You’re also an entrepreneur and co-founder of a branding and video production company. Tell us a bit about your journey and how God lead you there? And how does theology mix with business?    Michaela:  Life really is unpredictable, isn’t it? When I look back, I can see how all these different parts of my life weave together. But at first glance, one might wonder how all these parts make up a whole. My husband Dan and I both graduated with MDivs from Fuller and started our creative agency soon after, mostly as a way to make money in the middle of a recession. God has been very good to us through Long Winter Media. We’ve learned lots of lessons, met amazing people, created meaningful projects, and paid our bills.   A few years into that, I sort of twisted my own arm into going back to school to get a PhD. And because I was desperate to integrate my work as a business owner with my work as student of practical theology, I studied people who had charted their own way in work, people who I called faithful entrepreneurs. This work eventually led me to the De Pree Center. In my role, I get to bring my full self to the role: entrepreneurial in that I get to create programs and resources rooted in my research; writing and teaching about calling, work, and leadership; and because I have a background in creative content, I serve as creative director on many of our multi-media content offerings. It’s actually sort of a dream. And I don’t take that privilege lightly. I’m committed to stewarding the resources God has given me in this season (including the resource of myself!).       ADM:   What sparked your interest in practical theology as well as helping women in particular develop leadership skills?      Michaela:  Practical theology is a discipline that revolves around four basic questions:   1) What’s going on in the world?   2) Why is it going on?   3) How might the Bible or Christian tradition speak into it?   4) What should we do going forward?    Over and over again, practical theologians seek to answer these four questions in particular contexts with particular praxis. A quick example of how I might answer those questions around one particular reality of women in leadership , given my role at De Pree Center, might include: 1) Women lack adequate mentorship in the workplace; 2) Statistics show that a majority of senior level men are uncomfortable mentoring women in 1 on 1 situations. Because so many men occupy leadership positions, women are missing out on key mentoring relationships; 3) Right from the start, we see a biblical commissioning of men and women working together in the Garden; 4) What if we created resources that outlined for men “how to mentor a woman” in an approachable way? Therefore, how can we work toward more opportunities for women to be mentored? This is why I love practical theology. It’s critical, synthetic, and practical.        ADM:   Deaconess Mary Andrews, after whom our Bible college is named, once said that, “The measure of what you can do for the world will be simply what you let God do with yourself. With most of us God can do so little because we are so little between his hands. That Jesus really wants me and needs me is the wonder and strength of my life. He has met my every need and in him I am fully satisfied.”  In what ways might this resonate with you and your scholarship/work on vocation, calling and entrepreneurship? Are there any easy steps to discovering our calling, or “what you let God do with yourself”?    Michaela:  Wow, this quote resonates so much with me. It is convicting in that it highlights how our best  doing  comes not from getting great at  doing , but by deepening our  being . When we know who we are, and are deeply satisfied with Christ, it becomes like a wellspring bubbling up and impacting every move we make in the world.   I am convinced that most of what we think about how God’s calling works in our lives is limited and therefore unhelpful. I think God is much more interested in the long haul of our formation than any one thing we might put our hands to. And in that, the things we put our hands to are part of how God is always forming us. To let our beings sway in intimacy with God and all that God calls us to, we must ready ourselves to be disrupted over and over again.       ADM:   As Visiting Fellow for ADM, you’ll be coming to Sydney in August with your family during the time of our Annual Funding Event. Have you ever been to Australia?     Michaela:  It’s our first time. I’m bringing my whole crew: husband, two young children, my mother, and her husband!      ADM:   What do you think you’ll find in the land down under?     Michaela:  My three-year-old daughter talks nearly every day about seeing a kangaroo. She’s a big Winnie the Pooh fan and imagines that Australia is full of Kanga and Roos. So, fingers crossed.       ADM:   Finally, as women prepare their pitches for the    Annual Funding Event   , what advice or guidance would you give them? Could you recommend a few resources that might help women work toward their goals and/or consider how God is calling them? Final insights?    Michaela:  I am so excited to hear pitches from women there. I’m already praying for you and cheering you on! And, I know first hand how vulnerable it is to put yourself out there, so you’ve already got my respect. I’m excited for you to learn. Whenever I’ve given pitches (and I’ve given a lot), I inevitably have to get a little clearer on who I am, what I’m doing, and why it matters. And that process of refining and clarifying is a gift.  If I were going to encourage you to think about one thing for your pitch it would be  value add .  Value add  is a shorthand way to think about the benefit that you and/or your idea adds to society. As Christians, we might think explicitly about how what we’re doing is a  value add  for the Kingdom. What I’ve learned over time is that while ideas and stories might overlap, each person brings a unique  value add  to the table.   This means that even if there are five people who pitch an idea for a coffee shop that furthers justice in their community, each will do so in a unique way and therefore add unique value to the Kingdom. In this, we can helpfully shift our internal focus from competing with all the other ideas of the day and instead think about how together we can get clear on the unique  value add  of our idea, organisation, or project!

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Q&A with Michaela O'Donnell Long, 2019 ADM Visiting Fellow

Scheduled around this year’s Annual Funding Event, ADM will host Dr. Michaela O’Donnell Long from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA as a Visiting Fellow. ADM caught up with her recently and asked her the following questions…

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      Q&A: Bernie Black steps up in the brave world of leadership   When Bernie Black pitched at    ADM’s 2018 Annual Funding Event   , she knew exactly why she needed to be there: leadership development. Her organisation had grown and she needed help to lead well. Bernie’s idea landed and she won funding to participate in Harvard’s Kennedy School as well as in year-long mentoring through ADM’s Hub program of innovation. ADM wanted to hear about some of the things she learned in Boston—beside Red Sox baseball—knowing her insights would be helpful for others.       ADM:  In 2009, you founded the Brave Foundation in response to your own experiences as a teen parent. Tell us a bit about how the work has grown since.    Bernie : The vision of the Brave Foundation is to build a village of support and acceptance around expecting and parenting teens. Brave is the 10-year over-night success; in fact, we celebrate our 10-year anniversary in July 2019, with Her Excellency Kate Warner hosting us at Government House in Tasmania.   I am the Founding Director and essentially Brave is what I looked for and couldn’t find as a 16-year old expecting teen. I was shocked, very alone and scared at this time. So I made myself three promises late into my pregnancy: 1.) to somehow be a good mum – I’d hardly held a baby and wasn’t a maternal girl; 2.) to finish my secondary school education —I had no idea how to do this either; and 3.) if I fulfilled the first two, I would write something for others in the same situation.   In 2006, I wrote  Brave Little Bear  (this is the meaning of my name Bernadette), and due to its success, created Brave Foundation in 2009. Soon, people called me from all over Australia to find out how the expecting or parenting teen in their life could be connected to education and support. That was the beginning of our Directory of Services, which now has over 600 organisations listed and referred to nationally.   What I didn’t realise in the early days was that it would take time for Australia to have a conversation about how to help young parents. I learned how important it is to share a compelling vision with widely varied stakeholders. For me it’s now about knowing my audience and why my message matters to them. For example, the economic benefits of supporting young people in vulnerable situations may be more important to some, while others might care about the social impact we have.   But whether we have ever supported or known a young parent or not, we are all part of the Brave village. Just one positive voice, one ‘You can do it! ’ or one smile that smashes a stigma reminds us that we all have a role to play in helping those at risk of disadvantage, which many young parents can be.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Bernie graduates from her leadership course at Harvard’s Kennedy School.  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      ADM: Last year, you pitched at our 2018 Annual Funding Event. What were you hoping to get out of that experience? What happened?    Bernie:  It was a very empowering experience, and one I’m grateful for. A dear mentor and friend nominated me, so I felt encouraged from the get go. At the time, I was dreaming about the possibility of learning from an executive course at Harvard’s Kennedy School in Boston, MA. But that course, “Women and Power: Leadership in a New Generation” is one I couldn’t fund myself, even though I knew it could help solidify my leadership skills while strengthening and expanding the work of Brave Foundation where I serve as CEO.   So when I filled in the application for the Annual Funding Event, I explained that I would use the prize money to pay those course fees. I was astonished when I won my category!  Not only have I been blessed by participating in the Harvard Kennedy course (even to go there!), but the growth, strategy and direction of Brave has since increased dramatically. That means we’re able to help more people at risk of experiencing disadvantage, especially expecting and parenting teens. The women and team at ADM really champion women in the unique lanes they run in. The whole experience (of AFE and The Hub) has been a massive gift, personally, spiritually and professionally.      ADM: So your dream came true and you travelled to Harvard earlier this year for its leadership course. What were some of key insights you gained during your time there?    Bernie:  I learned that according to research most women are reluctant to ask questions. We likely get sweaty palms, question our questions a million times over, and even after this arduous process, we often decide  not  to ask the question. Research also shows that most men skip this process entirely and just ask a question without over-thinking; nor are they worried if the question doesn’t sound great. The moral of the story here is we need to ask questions and then ask more questions. Ladies, raise a hand because we need your perspective and influence.  Another key insight was realising that our vulnerability is a gift to others and can be a strength. The power of your ‘North Star’ story can also gain more traction in the career world, rather than your ‘Gold Star’ story, according to research. The Gold Star story is the one we often tell on our CV’s and biographies, which include your qualifications, roles, leadership advancement, experiences, etc. Your North Star story, however, uses your personal story of survivorship and vulnerability, and this creates a community of followers who are energised by your ideas, leadership and pioneering. When both the Gold Star and North Star elements of a person’s career and life story are told together, there is an increased opportunity for career advancement and personal joy and fulfillment.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              While in Boston, Bernie managed to catch a Boston Red Sox game.  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Finally, I learned about transformational and transactional leadership styles. I use a transformational leadership style, and research shows that women innately use this style because it creates longer lasting changes in a culture.   Four core ingredients of transformational leadership are:  •Individualised attention: why does what you are saying to someone matter to  them ?;  •Inspirational motivation: where you are taking the listener inspires them;   •Idealised themes: how connecting values and ethics with the person listening motivates them;  •Intellectual stimulation: acknowledges and challenges intellectual gifts.  Studies show women come out stronger than men in the use individualised attention.      ADM: What would you say are practical ways women can grow as leaders or as people of influence in their respective areas?    Bernie:  Perseverance, passion, persistence, sacrifice and lifelong learning! Keep knocking on doors and be bold. Keep asking questions. I went to Canberra 10 years ago but we didn’t receive federal funding until 2018. We need to remember why we’re doing what we’re doing.   I now have the privilege of reading the stories of young women in our Supporting Expecting and Parenting Teen program (who we assist intensively). As I do, I learn of the promises they make themselves, changing their own lives and their child’s as well as the generations beyond. Honestly, I didn’t know if I would live to see what is currently operating across Australia and am so grateful that I kept at it to be a part of this work.     ADM: As one of the winners last year at the AFE, what advice would you give to those women who are pitching this year?    Bernie:  Practice your five-minute pitch, but don’t overcook it. Authenticity is key. I wrote down five key points for each minute on a small palm card, in case I needed it, and it did help with my nerves.   By sharing a part of your personal story in your pitch, you can create a sense of transparency and vulnerability, which is a real strength. Be  you — that’s who all of us want to see because the world needs  your  idea. Enjoy the moment and regardless of the outcome, be prepared to make connections that will last, friends you haven’t met yet!       ADM:  What verse continues to inspire you as a woman flourishing in your work?    Bernie:  “If you are faithful in the little things, you will be faithful in the large ones,” -Luke 16:10.     Find out more about our    Annual Funding Event    and    Hub    for Christian women    here         At the Annual Funding Event (AFE), ADM awards funding to Australian Christian women to support them and multiply their effectiveness as they use their opportunities and gifts to develop gospel-shaped innovations. Applications are now open!    At the AFE, invitations will also be issued to become part of our Incubator Program. Our incubator is a community for Christian women leading for-profits, charities or community initiatives seeking to do gospel-shaped work.

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Q&A: Bernie Black steps up in the brave world of leadership

When Bernie Black pitched at ADM’s 2018 Annual Funding Event, she knew exactly why she needed to be there: leadership development. Her organisation had grown and she needed help to lead well.

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       Rev. Jackie Stoneman Announces her Retirement    “Therefore, my dear brothers and sisters, stand firm. Let nothing move you. Always give yourselves fully to the work of the Lord, because you know that your labour in the Lord is not in vain.” — 1 Corinthians 15:58    After 25 years on the faculty at MAC, including 12 years as Principal, Rev. Jackie Stoneman will retire at the end of 2019. Anglican Deaconess Ministries is grateful for Jackie’s faithful “labour in the Lord” and invites you to hear from her directly in the video below.                 Paul’s encouragement in 1 Corinthians 15:58 has always had a deep meaning for Rev. Stoneman. From the time she began her ministry, throughout her varied roles at MAC and now as she heads into retirement, she believes God’s call to “stand firm” and continue “fully in the work of the Lord” will continue to guide her in this next season.   Her faithful example is one which we at Anglican Deaconess Ministries will always value, especially as we celebrate the great work she’s helped establish at MAC in equipping women to serve Christ throughout the world.   Soon, the role of Principal will be advertised to enable a smooth transition for the College and students. Please pray with us that God will send us just the right person to continue building on Rev. Stoneman’s vision and work at Mary Andrews College as Christian women receive theological training to care for a world in need of Jesus. And please rejoice with us at God’s abundant provision of grace in and through Rev. Stoneman’s impact.   

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Rev. Jackie Stoneman Announces her Retirement

After 25 years on the faculty at MAC, including 12 years as Principal, Rev. Jackie Stoneman will retire at the end of 2019. Anglican Deaconess Ministries is grateful for Jackie’s faithful “labour in the Lord” and invites you to hear from her directly in this video.

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                 Celebrating History in the Making                 Thirty years ago as Queen Elizabeth graced the front page of The London Times, 14 Anglican women made their own headlines seven pages later in the same edition. The reason? They were the first women ordained as deacons in the Sydney Diocese.   This May, over 200 ministers and friends gathered in St Andrew’s Cathedral to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of that historic ordination, which also included 14 men. Rev. Jackie Stoneman, Director of Mary Andrews College, Rev. Jacinth Myles, ADM Chaplain to the Deaconesses and Retired Deacons, and Rev. Jan Donohoo, ADM board member, as well as Rev. Keith Condie, Co-Director of the Mental Health and Pastoral Care Institute, who were all ordained in 1989, took part in the anniversary service.     


  

  


 
   
    
      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      

        
          
             
              
                    
              

              
                
             
          
          
        

        

        

      
    
   

  

 


  

     
      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      

        
           
        

        

      
     

  





      “This is a wonderful opportunity to thank God for the significance of this event in the Sydney Diocese in terms of recognizing the ministry of women,” said Rev. Stoneman. “Here was an acknowledgement of the diaconal ministry that women were already doing.” Since 1989, 95 women have been ordained as Deacons in the Anglican diocese.    Rev. Condie considered it a great honour to be ordained alongside the history-making women. “The ordination service acknowledged that these women already had significant ministries which we men hadn’t had because we were just starting out,” he said. “Many have continued to make extraordinary contributions in a range of contexts since that time, which has been inspiring to see.”      
   
     “ God has indeed been faithful and continues to equip women, both ordained and lay, to serve Him to His glory. ” 
   
  
 
     Dean of the Cathedral, Kanishka Raffel, led the 30th anniversary service, and Rev. Di Nicolios, the first Archdeacon for Women’s Ministry, preached on 2 Timothy 4:1-8. The current Archdeacon for Women’s Ministry, the Ven. Kara Hartley, then interviewed Rev. Donohoo, ordained in 1989, and Rev. Ruth Schoeter, ordained in 2016. Archbishop Glenn Davies offered closing remarks and spoke of the significance of the ordination of women to the Diaconate and the importance of their ministry in the diocese. Following the service, ADM hosted a dinner for the original female deacons and those who’d come to celebrate.   “This is one way we could honour the many women who have become deacons in the Anglican church in Sydney,” said Rev. Stoneman. “God has indeed been faithful and continues to equip women, both ordained and lay, to serve Him to His glory.”        
  

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Celebrating History in the Making

Thirty years ago as Queen Elizabeth graced the front page of The London Times, 14 Anglican women made their own headlines seven pages later in the same edition. The reason? They were the first women ordained as deacons in the Sydney Diocese. This past May, over 200 ministers and friends gathered in St Andrew’s Cathedral to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of that historic ordination.

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       Deaconess House Update   16 April 2019     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Deaconess House  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     For over 125 years, Anglican Deaconess Ministries (ADM) has been focused on raising up women with theological formation for practical and public engagement.  More than 100 years ago, several Deaconesses, along with the women and men who supported them, sought a permanent place for the headquarters of the ministries and 26-28 Carillon Ave, Newtown, (Deaconess House) was purchased.  Over this past century, Deaconess House has been an important investment in the preparation of women for the work of God, either in Australia or overseas, and a symbol of that same commitment. We are grateful to God for Deaconess House which has enabled so many women to be formed theologically and prepared for ministry and mission, in the varied ways in which that has occurred. Deaconess House was even the first place in Australia to offer accommodation to overseas students.   Since January 2008, ADM has leased the Deaconess House buildings to Moore Theological College to accommodate Moore’s single female students. Consistent with our organisational commitment, we leased the buildings to Moore College in good faith so as to support the theological formation of their female students.  To that end, ADM undertook $250,000 of works on the buildings prior to the lease, a lease which then included $1 per year rent for Moore College to pay. Under the lease, Moore also agreed to maintain the buildings and to comply with OH&S requirements to ensure the ongoing safety and comfort of its residents, while charging its single female students residential fees. The lease stated that ADM and Moore would equally share the cost of any major repairs over the value of $5,000.  On Friday 12 April 2019, ADM’s Board of Directors reviewed the findings and recommendations of an OH&S Report it had commissioned of the site, and which it had received just prior to the meeting. The findings of life-safety concerns highlighted in the OH&S Report necessitated a difficult decision and immediate action: ADM Board instructed the College to vacate the buildings immediately for the safety of the remaining five students living there and terminated the lease of 26-28 Carillon Ave to Moore College. (In October 2018 Moore had asked the rest of the student body to vacate these buildings for safety concerns and had been in dialogue with ADM’s Board regularly.)  ADM’s Board has made a one-time gift of $100,000 to Moore College to assist with transitional housing arrangements for their female students and those who would have been residents in the buildings this academic year.  Appropriate members of Moore College and ADM are continuing to work together to bring positive resolve and care to those involved. It is our hope that these actions will not compromise our partnership for the Gospel of Jesus Christ, as we look forward to continuing to support one another’s efforts in helping Christian women flourish in God’s Kingdom. 

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Deaconess House Update

For over 125 years, Anglican Deaconess Ministries (ADM) has been focused on raising up women with theological formation for practical and public engagement.  More than 100 years ago, several Deaconesses, along with the women and men who supported them, sought a permanent place for the headquarters of the ministries and 26-28 Carillon Ave, Newtown, (Deaconess House) was purchased.

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      Australia: The Good Neighbour?  ADM and Micah Foundation Co-Host Panel Discussion on Foreign Policy  In a time of global suffering and political unrest, how can Australia best serve its global neighbours? As the nation approaches a federal election, how can Christians think biblically about engagement in politics?   Anglican Deaconess Ministries and Micah Australia teamed up to explore these questions in an evening of public discussion with Christian thought-leaders and elected representatives, including Dr. John Dickson, Senator Jenny McAllister and Dr. Kate Harrison Brennan.     “Australia: The Good Neighbour, A Conversation on Our Foreign Policy Trajectory”   took place Wednesday, 27th March 2019, at ADM’s office, Level 1, St Andrew's House, 464-480 Kent Street, Sydney. Nearly 75 people attended the evening event.  “We are blessed and privileged to live in Australia, but this comes with a responsibility to prayerfully consider, and actively engage, how we want to shape our nation’s future. We have an incredible opportunity to be a nation known for compassion and leadership as a good global neighbour,” said Libby Sanders, ADM’s Program Manager of Mercy and Justice. “As Christians, this should excite and compel us to participate prayerfully in discussions such as this.”      
   
     “ We have an incredible opportunity to be a nation known for compassion and leadership as a good global neighbour. As Christians, this should excite and compel us to participate prayerfully in discussions such as this. ” 
   
  
 
     Dr. John Dickson, an author, speaker, theologian and the founding director of the Centre for Public Christianity, kicked off the event with reflections of what where he saw first hand during a recent trip with Australian Aid supporting Syrian refugees in Jordan and Lebanon.  Next, Senator Jenny McAllister, an Australian Labor Party Senator for New South Wales and the Shadow Assistant Minister for Families and Communities, offered a few remarks. Senator McAllister then joined Dr. Dickson and ADM CEO, Dr. Kate Harrison Brennan, a former Advisor to Prime Minister Julia Gillard, for a panel discussion moderated by Micah Campaign Director Matt Darvas. (A representative from the Liberal party was invited to participate but had to send regrets.). Questions of foreign policy positions and Australia’s role as a global neighbour guided the conversation.   "This is an important moment for Christians to consider our responsibilities to the poor and the vulnerable who are on our doorstep as a nation,” said Darvas. “Even as we near an election that will be focused on domestic issues, this will be a night to talk about those who don't have a vote in this election and what our responsibility is to them."      
   
     “ This is an important moment for Christians to consider our responsibilities to the poor and the vulnerable who are on our doorstep as a nation ” 
   
  
 
     Everyone is welcome. Tickets and more information are available  here

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Australia: The Good Neighbour? ADM and Micah Foundation Co-Host Panel Discussion on Foreign Policy

In a time of global suffering and political unrest, how can Australia best serve its global neighbours? As the nation approaches a federal election, how can Christians think biblically about engagement in politics?

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      How to Care for Those with Mental Illness:  New courses provide practical help   – By Hayley Lukabyo   When friends confide about their struggles with a mental health challenge, it’s not always easy for Christians to know how to respond. Beyond dropping off a casserole, what practical ways can we offer genuine love and Christian care?  Considering almost half of all Australians experience a mental illness in their lives, the question is both timely and relevant, reflecting an ever-growing need for Christians to have biblical and practical ways to address such challenges. Sarah Condie, co-director of ADM’s Mental Health and Pastoral Care Institute (MHPCI),  notes that  “with mental health challenges on the rise – whether depression, loneliness or more difficult illnesses ­– Christians are increasingly faced with questions of caring more deeply for those in our midst.”  Several new short courses, then, have been created with these questions in mind. Co-sponsored by the MHPCI and Mary Andrews College, a variety of upcoming short courses focus on equipping church members, ministry staff and leaders to care for those in their congregations facing mental health challenges:      Mental Health 101 on 27th March      Mental Health Masterclass on 3rd April     Times and fees vary and enrolment has filled up quickly for this term; however, some spaces are still available through:   www.mentalhealthinstitute.org.au/shortcourses    “There is great encouragement when a group of like-minded people gather around a topic that is significant for them, and that is why I’m excited to be a part of the short courses developed here”, says Kerrie Newmarch, ADM Director of Church Engagement and Training. “These new courses provide a great opportunity to develop our understanding and compassion of areas for well being, which can be difficult.”   The Mental Health and Pastoral Care Institute takes a holistic approach to addressing various challenges and aspects of mental illness, combining elements of pastoral care with current research in psychology.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Rev. Dr Keith Condie  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     “Our starting point is God’s loving concern for the spiritual, mental, emotional, physical and social well being of all”, says Rev. Dr. Keith Condie, co-director of the MHPCI. “We are convinced that the Gospel of Jesus Christ speaks into all life contexts to provide grace and encouragement, and to alleviate distress.”    Mental Health 101  provides participants with an overview of common mental health disorders, how the mental health system works in Australia, the role of the church and how to respond to a crisis. Dr. Condie will conduct the course, which is open for all church members seeking to understand the needs of those within their communities.    Dr. Condie, alongside Jackie Stoneman, Director of Studies at Mary Andrews College, will also run a  Mental Health Masterclass  for ministry staff and pastoral care workers, which provides a theological and practical framework for navigating mental illness and church life with wisdom.       

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Rev. Jackie Stoneman  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Rev. Stoneman will teach  People Matters , introducing specific and practical skills for all church members who want to build effective and caring relationships that honour Christ. Grounded in biblical principles, the course deepens participants’ understanding of people and knowledge of what makes healthy relationships while carrying out God’s work in caring for others.   To find out more about the Institute’s ongoing short courses, or other new initiatives such as the Building a Safe and Strong Marriage course and the Raising Resilient Parents course, visit the website  here .

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How to Care for Those with Mental Illness: New courses provide practical help

When friends confide about their struggles with a mental health challenge, it’s not always easy for Christians to know how to respond. Beyond dropping off a casserole, what practical ways can we offer genuine love and Christian care?

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